What Do Shemale Porn and the Twilight Novels Have in Common?

[ This article is based upon the 2012 Idea City talk “What do shemale porn and Edward Cullen have in common?” ]

During our expansive exploration of sexual desire, we encountered a number of popular erotic interests that defied academic predictions and evolutionary theory. For example, among heterosexual men, the stunning popularity of shemale porn (sometimes referred to as futanari), incest porn, and bukkake porn, three of the most searched for erotic genres in the world. Among women, slash fan fiction (romantic and erotic male-male stories), incest stories, and the phenomenal global popularity of paranormal romance, whose leading example is Stephanie Myers’ Twilight novels.

As computational neuroscientists, we turned to the design of the brain to attempt to explain these prevalent yet baffling erotic tastes. In particular, we considered the operation of “sexual cues,” hardwired sexual taste predispositions analogous to our hardwired gustatory tastes. Just as our brains come hard-wired with five different taste cues—salty, sour, sweet, savory, bitter (some researchers add metallic and fat), our brains also come hard-wired with a finite set of sexual cues. However, though male and female brains share the same taste cues, our brains come loaded with entirely different sets of sexual cues. It’s as if the male brain has salty and sour cues, and the female brain has bitter and sweet cues. If we each tasted the sexual equivalent of peanut brittle, a man would report a salty flavor while a woman would report its sweetness.

In previous computational neuroscience research, we had modeled how the brain manufactured optical illusions, such as the enigmatic Mona Lisa smile, by simultaneously juxtaposing two different visual cues to create a strange and beguiling gestalt that was perceptually “more than the sum of its parts.” (In the case of the Mona Lisa smile, da Vinci juxtaposed a low-frequency grin with a high-frequency flat expression to produce the beguiling smile that seems to appear or disappear depending on where your eyes come to rest on the painting.) Our brain can also be tricked by gustatory illusions: restaurants like Chili’s and T.G.I.Friday’s hire food engineers who craft culinary concoctions that combine different gustatory cues (salty, fatty, sweet, crunchy) into irresistible gustatory illusions that promote what the food industry calls cravability, such as Chili’s Texas Cheese Fries or Cheesecake Factory’s Oreo Dream Extreme Cheesecake.

It appears that our brains might also be tricked by erotical illusions. By combining (or distorting) multiple sexual cues into novel gestalts, it’s possible to evoke bewilderingly intense sexual arousal. Male erotical illusions are mostly visual, since the male sexual brain consists primarily of visual cues. Female erotical illusions are mostly psychological, since the female sexual brain consists primarily of psychological cues.

Erotical illusions account for one of the most popular and baffling sexual interests of heterosexual men: shemale porn. (Many transsexuals find the term “shemale” offensive when applied to an individual, though this is the common term for the genre within the adult industry.) Figures in shemale porn feature the body of a woman and a penis, often a large one.

In Japanese anime, transsexual characters are known as futanari. Futanari porn reveals exactly what appeals to straight men about shemales. Futanari characters are drawn with hyperfeminine bodies, typically very young, with large round breasts and hourglass figures, large eyes with long eyelashes and beautiful faces. They also possess giant horse-sized penises. Typical futanari features schoolgirls with giant protrusions beneath their plaid skirts, teenage girls with pink hair and a bulge in their jeans, slender ballerinas in tutus and sporting erections as long as their slender legs.

Recently, contemporary adult webmasters have found ways to manufacture “artificial shemales” that do not involve the use of actual transsexual actresses. The women are voluptuous and curvy, with enormous strap-on dildos that look like authentic if colossally oversized penises. The site is full of scenes of attractive, busty women stroking their giant artificial manhood.

The site makes the erotical illusion very clear: anatomical cues of femininity juxtaposed with the visual cue of a penis. (The penis is a prominent sexual cue for many heterosexual men.)

What about the opposite? What about someone with strong muscular arms, tattooed biceps, a bald head, a beard—and a vagina? The most famous transsexual male porn star is the cigar-puffing Buck Angel.

Buck Angel combines a number of visual cues of masculinity with the single feminine cue of a vagina. Straight men express no interest in Buck Angel, and some find him disquieting. But many gay men find him extremely intriguing. The sexual brains of most women, however, do not respond to Buck Angel as a visual erotical illusion. Instead, erotical illusions comprised of psychological cues are more effective at tricking the female sexual brain—such as paranormal romance.

Some of the psychological cues that consistently appear in the hundreds of thousands of female-authored erotic stories and the thousands of digital romance novels we analyzed include heroes who are alpha males (strong, confident leaders), intelligent and experienced, willing to protect women from physical harm, desired by many women (though they only love the heroine), who lust intensely after the inexplicably irresistible heroine, who hide a secret tender side, and whose aggressive nature is tamed by the heroine’s love. It turns out that these cues are all whirled together and amplified in the stories of paranormal romance.

Consider Edward Cullen, the vampire hero of Twilight. Since he is a vampire, he has the body of a 17-year old hotty—but the experienced, mature mind of a 107 year old. He is the ultimate alpha: an immortal warrior dispatches human bullies with ruthless ease, rescuing Bella Swan time and again. All the girls at Bella’s high school have crushed on Edward—but he is only interested in Bella, because of her inexplicably delicious smell. He lusts after Bella—literally, since he lusts after the blood coursing through her veins—but demonstrates his love for Bella by not acting on his primal urge to rip open her neck and drink her blood. Cullen is an Oreo Extreme Dream Cheesecake for the female sexual brain: a superalpha who eternally lusts after one uniquely special woman, but who forever demonstrates his kind and loving heart by not acting upon his savage impulses—at least, not when he’s around his beloved; he’s free to release his barbaric side when challenged by villainous opponents.

Unlike women, men are not aroused by romantic stories of vampire women with youthful bodies and elderly minds. The male sexual brain does not process the same sort of literary erotical illusion.

Erotical illusions make vivid one of the most fascinating aspects of human sexuality: that much of sexual arousal results from the integrative sorcery of our imagination. For more, watch the 2012 Idea City talk “What do shemale porn and Edward Cullen have in common?”

Dr. Ogi Ogas received his PhD in computational neuroscience from Boston University and was a Department of Homeland Security Fellow. His writing has been published in the Boston Globe, Wall Street Journal, Glamour, Wired, Baltimore Magazine, and Seed.  He used his knowledge of cognition to reach the million dollar question on Who Wants to Be a Millionaire and battle Ken Jennings in the finals of Grand Slam.

Yeah Just There

Geometric porn…brought to you by Grant Orchard from Studio AKA. Curl up by the fire, turn up the volume and enjoy.

Men Who Shame Women, Sexuality, Parenting, and Bukkake

Have a question for me?  Email me at AdviceFromMsM@gmail.com

Follow me on facialbook and clitter! _______________________________________________________________________

Dear Ms. M.,

I started dating a guy three weeks ago and things have been moving very quickly. We have spent nearly every single night together since we met. Last weekend he demanded I make a timeline of people I’ve hooked-up with, naming who and when. I thought it was ridiculous but we were really intoxicated.  I just wrote something down even though I really don’t keep a running tally fresh in my mind to recite off the top of my head. I’m 23, and lost my virginity at 16. I hooked-up a lot in college but I take pride that I’ve always been safe. He’s 32. After I made the timeline, that night for the first time he started calling me whore, slut, and dirty during sex.  He had never done that before. It shocked me and made me super uncomfortable. Needless to say I didn’t climax. Two days later when we were intoxicated again, he started drilling me on the timeline, I guess to test me to see if what I said matched what I wrote. Some of it didn’t coincide so he got really mad. I asked him if he had memorized my timeline or something, then told him he should make one too. He said that it didn’t matter for him because he is a guy. I’m having second thoughts even though I’ve already started falling for him. Other than this incident he seems like a good guy. He has a good job, nice apartment, a Porsche, and went to Yale undergrad and Harvard Law. He’s also shown signs of jealousy toward my friends, even my girlfriends and guy friends who are gay. My friends don’t like him except for the fact he always picks up the tab when we’re out. What do you think?

-Second Thoughts

Honey, don’t walk, RUN from this a-hole. You will never find fulfillment or equality of any kind in this relationship if he lives by and accepts the double standards of society. Let me guess, he has a small penis too? I am hearing an insecure little boy from what you describe. The only way he can feel empowered and secure in this relationship is to make you feel embarrassed and ashamed of yourself. It’s the first step to gaining control of you – tearing you and your ego down – and what an awful way to do it too by dissecting your sexuality and your past. You should be proud of what you’ve been through, good and bad. It’s made you the woman you are. Showing signs of jealousy toward your friends is another red flag that he’s a control monster.

This is the start of a co-dependent unhealthy relationship. Leave while you still can. If you want to be that superficial dumb girl who gets with and stays with a guy for the wrong reasons (he looks good on paper – Harvard, Yale, job, Porsche), then this is your learning experience and I pray it doesn’t side swipe your life and leave you to wake up in 10 years wondering where you lost yourself. It sounds like underneath the surface, this guy has some serious issues that he will try to project onto you rather than deal with himself. Do you know how easy it is to “fall” for someone in three weeks? You need to jam pack a week of hanging with your gals and gays. Start dating other people PRONTO to distract you from this pathetic excuse of a man. You don’t need to be settling down at 23 anyway. If you spent this time and energy becoming successful in your own career, it wouldn’t matter that he was picking up the tab, and you sure as hell wouldn’t be putting up with a man who gets off on shaming women. You see the red flags, so stop acting dumb and get it together, girl. You know what to do. 

-Ms. M.

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Dear Ms. M.,

My brother and I both look at porn on our family desktop in the office because neither of us have our own computers. I’m 17 and he’s 16. I only know my bro looks at it because I see the history and he locks the door when he’s in there.  I’m certain my parents know for the same reason. The other day I was just curious so I looked at some gay porn. The next day my dad sat us both down to talk about it. I was embarrassed he brought it up in front of my brother. It was like he was trying to figure out which one of us was looking at it. It was like looking at gay porn was wrong but hetero porn was fine. My uncle is gay and fully accepted by our family so I don’t get what the big deal is but it still made me embarrassed and ashamed. The thing is I’m not sure if I’m gay. I’ve always had crushes on girls and dated girls but I also feel really excited when I look at gay porn. Do you think I’m gay?

Darling, I can look at tranny or midget porn and feel my clit swell sometimes. Ain’t no thang! Just because you look at something and become turned on by it, it does not define who you are sexually, nor does it define your sexuality. In fact, it means you’re an empathetic being, which is a very beautiful thing. How great it is that you’re open enough to understand sexual energy between human beings – not just a man and a woman. It’s sad your parents don’t see it this way.

I cannot tell you if you’re gay, but I can tell you that sexuality is not just a label – gay, bi, or straight. It’s more a spectrum of colors in between all of those labels, that can change and shift throughout your life. As you move to matters beyond porn, continue your openness and experiment. You never know what flavor of ice cream is your favorite, and with which toppings, until you try all the combinations, right? If it turns out you do like both men and women, then look at the bright side – at least you have a lot more potential people to fall in love with. You’re a sexual being, and that makes you perfectly normal and healthy. That’s really all that matters!

Don’t worry about your parents. They probably just need to get laid more than on their anniversary and birthdays. Do me a favor though, will you? Don’t let them make you feel ashamed, and don’t allow shame or guilt to build a prison in your mind; that will only hurt you in the long run. Look at what you wish online. Use your imagination sometimes without porn too. Enjoy yourself. And if they give you any more sh*t, leave this page for them to find as the last viewed in your computer history.

Love Always,

Ms. M.

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Hi,

I was a single dad raising my 15 year old son for 10 years before I married last month. She and my son adjusted to living with each other well up until now. She was taking the laundry upstairs when she walked into his room and caught him jerking off to explicit porn. She didn’t wait until I was home from work to discuss it with me. She told him right then and there he was disgusting and filthy and she didn’t want that going on in her house. Then she grounded him for two weeks. When she relayed to me what she said to him and the punishment, my heart sank. I didn’t agree, but I didn’t want to cause more problems in the house. I’ve kept my mouth shut to keep the peace. However, I don’t want my son to feel like what he did was wrong or that he is filthy or disgusting. I worked hard facilitating an open honest relationship with him so he could come to me about anything, but he hasn’t mentioned this. Should I say something to him?

-Worried Dad

Someone needs to slap you up side your head, Pussy Worried Dad. First of all, what kind of example are you setting to your son if you let this woman come into your house and take over, making punishments without consulting you, and declaring it her house? It was yours and your son’s house before she ever came into the picture. What you’re telling me is that you’re in a relationship where your wife makes important decisions that impact your son without communicating or consulting with you first. Therefore, I hope she’s blowing you multiple times a day, rimming you, and rubbing your feet. Let me ask you this: Do you really want him to follow in your footsteps and marry a control freak of a woman, who makes him keep his mouth shut just to keep the peace – even at the sacrifice of his own children?

You need to grow a pair and set some boundaries for your new wife if this household thing is going to work. The first one should be to have the common decency and courtesy to knock on your teenage son’s door. Have a stern talk with her to ensure she knows that before she reacts with punishment or passing judgement on your son, it needs to be discussed with you first. And absolutely no name calling (filthy, disgusting)! Explain to her that what he did was not filthy or disgusting, and it’s very much a part of normal teenage sexuality. You also need to convince your wife to apologize to your son. She disrespected his space by entering his room without knocking, and then called him names.

I can’t resist mentioning, that if she thinks jerking off to porn is filthy, I wonder how boring your sex life must be?

Regarding your son, yes you absolutely need to talk to him and assure him that what he did was not wrong, not filthy, and not disgusting. Un-ground him. This could have serious implications as an imprint on his sexuality, so the sooner you attempt to reverse it, the better. You may also want to consider getting him a lock for his bedroom door. Here’s a script to try:

“Hey Buddy. I know about what happened, and I don’t agree with what she said or how she reacted whatsoever. I’m sorry she said what she did, and I want you to know that jerking off to porn is totally normal, especially at your age. I did it with my dad’s playboys – if we had only had internet porn back then! One thing I can tell you from an old man’s perspective, it’s good sometimes to lay off the porn and just try to use your imagination. It maintains a good balance. Masturbating is definitely not filthy or disgusting; I think she just reacted inappropriately because it startled her. I want to assure you, I’ve spoken with her, and she has promised not to barge into your room like that anymore without knocking first. It’s important you feel comfortable and safe enough to enjoy yourself in the privacy of your own room in our house. I’m proud of you for taking matters into your own hands, Son! … ”

Then maybe you can share a funny awkward story of something you went through – the time you lost your virginity, or maybe a time when you were walked in on too. This is an opportunity for you to build a bond as friends because he’s getting to an age where having some basis of friendship is just as important as him having respect for you as a parent. You want to maintain that trust. You also don’t want him to loose respect for you because you don’t have the balls to stand up to your wife. Be as empathetic as possible and relate to him; he needs to know you have his back. Whatever you do, don’t pussy out and defend her actions and prudish words. Your wife is the one who is in the wrong here, and by you not standing up to her, you’re equally as wrong.

Best of Luck,

Ms. M.

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Ms. M.,

I am an open-minded girlfriend and I’m cool with the fact my boyfriend watches a lot of porn.  He once told me he goes through phases of what he likes to watch.  Yesterday I decided to ask him what his favorite porn du jour was.  He said boo cockey. I played along like I knew what he was talking about but when I looked it up on urban dictionary all I found was http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=boo%20cockey   It doesn’t make sense to me unless he likes seeing girls scream in a high pitch maybe?

-Curious Cool Girlfriend

Dear CCG,

Girrrrrrrrl, I hope you like facials … and not the kind from Elizabeth Arden. He wasn’t talking about a high-pitched yell, or a circle jerk with firemen covered in ashes. You just misspelled it. He was talking about bukkake, derived from the oh-so-sexually-different Japanese culture. It’s when multiple men jizz all over a girl’s face. A bukkake party can sometimes have hundreds of men. Here’s a look, and here’s another. And remember, just because he’s beatin’ his meat to it, doesn’t mean he wants you to be that girl in the center of a bukkake party. But you could play nice, surprise him with a blow job on your knees, look up at him like an innocent little girl, then pull him out of your mouth and let him spray all over your face. After all, sperm has 80% of our daily intake of vitamin C, so it’s great for your skin. Oh, and one last thing – you might want to wear glasses. If you get it in your eyes, it can sometimes burn and leave them looking bloodshot. ; ) Happy Spa Day!

Now if you’ll excuse me, I’ve got to go masturbate.

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Have a question for Ms. M.?  Email her here: AdviceFromMsM@gmail.com

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In this issue: The Cosmo Clitoris Heist

Friends with Benefits is a bi-weekly newsletter MoSex publishes to keep you up on your sex news and send you invites and deals just for friends of the Museum.

In this issue:

1.  Richard Bennett on full exhibit
2.  The Cosmo Clitoris Heist
3.  3utt
4.  Rio brothel wars
5.  Did you just have sex? VICE wants to know.
6.  Naughty cookies
7.  SFW porn mashup music video. WHA??
8.  Orgasms
9.  “Most of the time I do the penetrating, it’s maybe a 60-40 ratio.”

 

Check out this issue here, and sign up here so you don’t miss the next one.

 

Featured image, currently on view in the Spotlight Gallery:

Photograph of Richard Bennett

Les Demi Dieux

Collection of Jim Kempster and Bob Loncar, bigkugels.com

Exploring the Kinkier Side of Porn

By Mark Hay from The Morningside After

A couple of weeks ago I sat down to catch up on Louie, the semi-biographical brainchild of comedian Louis C.K. The show has touched upon sex before, but a nugget of observation in the episode “Eddie” caught my attention: Otherwise a cautionary tale of a darker side of the bile of comedy, the episode features a sex-centric standup routine by a rock-bottom comedian of the same name.[1] In one riff, Eddie puzzles at the “recommendations” section of the free streaming porn site, YouPorn.

“If you use YouPorn, be careful, because they track what you beat off to. Go up to the top of YouPorn next time you’re on YouPorn and click recommended for you. … It’s like Amazon: ‘People who beat off to this also beat off to this, this, and that.’ A lot of that stuff you’re not into. How is cock and ball torture equal to peeing on me? I don’t want you to pee on me! … That’s gross!”

A funny quip, and part of a larger narrative of a man’s loss of desire and disengagement from physicality, but it raises interesting questions. We’ve already gotten the story of porn on the Internet—diversity, incredible accessibility, and a host of debates that followed. But as the porn industry catches up with other online trends (open sourced content, streaming free video, content tracking, and recommendation algorithms), we stand at the edge of another pornographic and sexual revolution, both in terms of our understanding and of the common sexual vocabulary.

In many ways, this is nothing more than the next logical step in a sexual revolution spurred by porn as far back as the birth of public adult theaters. Dr. Jennifer Nash, then a visiting Humanities Fellow at Columbia University, first explained to me the transformative value of pornography in new medias two years ago. Nash studies pornography—one of the few serious academics willing to do so, and her ability to throw around Mike in BrazilBrazzers and other porn sites in the same breath as respected sociological theorists is both refreshing and astounding. As Nash put it to me, the movement of pornography onto the big screen and into mass distribution via videos mitigated the isolation and psychological distress of many sexual minorities.

“A gay man in Texas,” said Nash, “could go to a theater to see a porn and realize, ‘Woah, I’m not the only one who has these feelings.’”

These mediums though were limited to big porn production houses selling in markets that could restrict buyers, which controlled the availability of fantasy deviating beyond those of white male heterosexual norms. The proliferation of pornography onto the Internet, though, and the spread of editing and sharing tools allowed for an explosion in amateur and niche video—a plurality of pornography with something for every taste and widely available for public and reinforcing, or private and safe viewings by absolutely anyone with a basic Internet connection.

Porn’s explosion onto the Internet became a source of exposure of, and education for, the public to non-basic white male heterosexual sexual mechanics. It allowed the exploration of unique sexual experiences and the development of appetites—as Nash puts it: “These films can teach us much about sex, bodies, alternative forms of pleasure, and in that way can provide comfort—they might even be a big part of sexual education.”

Many individuals fear that this explosion just enables the darkest fetishes—pedophilia, rape, and sexual abuse. Anecdotally in conversations with sex crimes prosecutors, they seem to think the nature of their cases has grown markedly weirder since the advent of the Internet (I could tell a few stories involving frozen feces, constriction, squirrel carcasses, and nettles, but I will refrain for the sake of space and mystery). And there’s been a long string of research to support the idea that exposure to pornography decreases sympathy towards female victims of rape and compassion towards women in general.[2]

But, as Nash says, “This [mentality] leads to a fear that what we view is what we do. It’s not so one-to-one.” A host of further studies have found that the availability of pornography decreases sex crimes.[3] Beyond that, frequent viewers of porn, even in its early video stages, were consistently more comfortable discussing sex and were more open to diverse ways of achieving orgasm.[4]

So that’s where we stand—the Internet has enabled comfort with fetishes through an explosion in user-created porn across all different spectrums of desire. But one problem of the Internet thus far is that it has failed to enable exploration—the foot fetishist may not know himself a foot fetishist or may not know what to look for if he suspects his feet are eroticized. The norms of sex—busty, heterosexual humping with copious manufactured moans and a healthy money shot at the end—still proliferate many individuals’ experience and (as many a woman can tell you) have helped to shape and normalize a sometimes dissatisfying sexual environment.

Therein lies the virtue of YouPorn and its equivalents eerily tracking your masturbatory habits—in making recommendations, these sites now offer a way for a viewer to expand his or her sexual vocabulary, exploring new fantasies, desires, and fetishes. Because these recommendations are made on the basis of what other people like you enjoyed, there is an implicit approval that it’s alright for you to explore this realm of sexuality, and especially because it is usually an amateur production the social barriers are doubly removed. And as the free nature of these streaming sites attracts more and more viewers away from the norm of sites, it stands to challenge the widespread narratives of pornography and open up an increasing diversity in sexuality.

Even if the algorithms are horrible (as Eddie notes, he has no interest in urination porn), there’s benefit. Laura Kipnis’s book Bound and Gagged: Pornography and the Politics of Fantasy makes the case that fetishes can challenge our aesthetic prejudices and tear up our built up senses of disgust. (Disgust, it should be acknowledged, is tricky. At a biological level it theoretically exists to keep us from doing things that are unnatural or dangerous. Yet much disgust is constructed—the accumulation of taboo and power that serves little biological purpose and less social purpose now than to disenfranchise portions of society.) But when Kipnis wrote the book there was little chance that these fetishes would have a large effect on the general population. Now the tracking of commonly used porn sites exposes viewers to content they would not otherwise find, and challenges them to view content that may initially disgust them, but that they must accept that others view and appreciate, and they may come to appreciate in their own way.

Any way you slice it, the same technology that puts countless ads for MuslimSingles.com on my Facebook wall now seems to want to challenge sexual orthodoxy and ring in, unintentionally, a new age—an age of plurality in pleasure, of pornography that opens up rather than restricts and shapes sexual experience and education, of the deconstruction of social taboos of disgust. Sure, a one-night stand may get a tad bit less predictable. But it’s an exciting new world nonetheless.

[1] Played by Doug Stanhope.

[2] See Dolf Zillmann and Jennings Bryant’s 1982 article in the Journal of Communcations for reference.

[3] Especially child pornography—see Berl Kutchinsky in a 1973 article in the Journal of Social Issues or the more recent article “How the Web Prevents Rape” on Slate.

[4] Pornography and Sexual Deviance by Michael Goldstein, Harold Kant, and John Hartman (1973)

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This blog post was contributed by The Morningside After, the newest sex magazine at Columbia University. Their mission is to bring sex and sexuality into the mainstream discourse through student-written fiction and non-fiction, tips, advice, resources, and facts essential to understanding human sexuality. They aim to keep the magazine accessible yet tasteful and to supplement written submissions with student photography and art and input from other campus organizations. Check it out here: themorningsideafter.wordpress.com

Casting Call: VICE Wants To Talk To You About Sex!

This could be your chance to be a star. VICE is looking for partners to participate in a video series about sex!

Do you have sex? Do you enjoy having sex? Do you not enjoy sex? Are you interested in having a genuine conversation about sex? Do you and your sexual partner have something you can teach us about sex? They’re looking for couples or partners ages 21-121 of ALL backgrounds and practices–gay, straight, bi, transgender, everything­–to participate in an online video series that adds to a larger, genuine conversation about sex. With this series, their aim is to learn interpersonal dynamics and how people connect through sex.

Here’s the shoot:
They’ll interview you before having sex, learn a bit about who you are, what you do, etc. Leave the room (they will not film you while having sex, no hidden cameras), and then return for a post-copulation conversation. No nudity is involved.

VICE will begin shooting next week and continue into April. If you’re interested, please email casting(at)vice.com with the following information:

  • Name, which does not need to be included in the show itself
  •  Age, proof of age (must be +21)
  • Location (must be Tri-State Areal
  • A photo of you and your partner
  • A photo of the room or space where you will have sex
  • Why you are interested in participating in the series

Wait! There’s a second casting call! VICE also wants to talk to you about porn. They’re creating an online video series about the effects of porn, the positive and the negative. They want to hear what you have to say. Again, no nudity, just a simple sit-down interview.

In 2006, the average age at which kids first see porn online was 11. Today many believe the age has dropped to 8. Are you a part of this new generation? How old were you when you first saw porn? Has porn had an effect on your relationships? Have you been involved with porn in anyway, as a viewer or participant?

If you’d like to particpate, please email casting(at)vice.com with the following information:

  • Name
  • Picture
  • Age (18+)
  • Why you are interested in participating in this series

Good luck!