Cliteracy, 100 Natural Laws

 

An artist named Sophia Wallace emailed my advice column the other day to invite me to the debut of her art project, Cliteracy, 100 Natural Laws. Of course I couldn’t refuse an opportunity to attend something with a name like that! When I wrote back telling her I would be there, she was kind enough to put me on her VIP list, adding, “I’m so happy to connect. I really appreciated your thoughtful research as I worked on CLITERACY over this last year.”

 

What’s great about standing in front of the piece for an extended period of time, is the experience of constantly catching some new tidbit of information the eyes hadn’t seen before. It was thrilling to watch the wheels begin turning in peoples’ minds as they viewed the work. That’s precisely when I would approach and ask, “Are you learning something new?” Nearly everyone answered with a resounding YES!

As the artist described her project via email:

“CLITERACY, 100 Natural Laws is mixed media project that explores a paradox: the global obsession with sexualizing female bodies in a world that is illiterate when it comes to female sexuality. The project reveals – the phallic as neutral – bias in science, law, philosophy, politics, religion, media and art.”

CLITERACY is the result of her Van Lier Fellowship in the Art and Law Residency Program, founded by the Volunteer Lawyers for the Arts . You can still catch a glimpse of her work at the Dumbo Arts Center in Brooklyn as part of the Scènes à Faire exhibition through October 21st, 2012.

What’s even better than seeing the work? Joining in the conversation with the artist herself, on October 16th, 2012 from 7PM – 8:30 at the Dumbo Arts Center.

Here are some of the laws from the project:

        You don’t know what you think you know about the clitoris.

        The clitoris is not a button, it is an iceberg.

        Clitoris, say my name say my name.

        Lady Justice, where is the liberty in sex without orgasms?

        When auditioning a new lover test out their manual and oral skills if those are lacking take heed.

        Freedom in society can be measured by the distribution of orgasms.

        A man would never be expected to get off through sex acts that ignored his primary sexual organ.

        Terrorism is having sex your entire adult life, giving birth to 6 children, and never experiencing orgasm.

        Viagra won’t make you cliterate.

        Orgasm is a fundamental inalienable human right.

        Democracy without cliteracy? Phallusy

What natural laws would YOU propose to help the world become more cliterate?

 

Follow Ms. M. on Facebook and Twitter.

Have a question or comment? Email: AdviceFromMsM@gmail.com

 

In this issue: The Cosmo Clitoris Heist

Friends with Benefits is a bi-weekly newsletter MoSex publishes to keep you up on your sex news and send you invites and deals just for friends of the Museum.

In this issue:

1.  Richard Bennett on full exhibit
2.  The Cosmo Clitoris Heist
3.  3utt
4.  Rio brothel wars
5.  Did you just have sex? VICE wants to know.
6.  Naughty cookies
7.  SFW porn mashup music video. WHA??
8.  Orgasms
9.  “Most of the time I do the penetrating, it’s maybe a 60-40 ratio.”

 

Check out this issue here, and sign up here so you don’t miss the next one.

 

Featured image, currently on view in the Spotlight Gallery:

Photograph of Richard Bennett

Les Demi Dieux

Collection of Jim Kempster and Bob Loncar, bigkugels.com

How Cosmo Stole the Clitoris: Plagiarism in Print

Ms. M

Try asking the next person you encounter to tell you where the clitoris is located.  Having posed this question to others many times myself, I’ll guess that the majority of answers you receive will sound something like, “It’s that small bulb at the top of my lips,” or, “That’s the button up under the hood.”

Although these responses aren’t exactly wrong, the interesting truth is that the majority of the clitoris is actually within the pelvis – that is, it’s far more internal than external. Even most of the women I coach, women who are generally worldly and well-informed about their own bodies, react with a combination of fascination and confusion when I explain that their clitoris extends deep within them.

This is Sex 101 according to Ms. M, a sex therapist, professional musician and composer, and advice columnist for the New York Museum of Sex. (Recent: Swing Clubs and Breakups, Father-Daughter Sex and How to Have Safe Double-Penetration.)

I co-edit digital publications for the Museum with Lia Wong, and invited Ms. M to contribute to the blog.

I’m quoting her November 30 post, The Internal Clitoris, highlighting the research of Dr. Buisson, Dr. Foldès, and Dr. O’Connell on the structure of the internal clitoris – and translating for the rest of us:

What does all this mean? Well, for starters, we can finally end that age-old debate of vaginal vs. clitoral orgasms.

It’s all the same clitoris. Eureka!The web responded: Ms. M’s post received 150,000 pageviews and counting, over 100 comments (mostly “thank you”) and dozens of pingbacks.

Robert T. Gonzalez for io9.com:  Until 2009, the human clitoris was an absolute mystery.

Andrew Sullivan for TheDailyBeast: The Clitoral Hug (although he was a bit lazy not to credit the author by name).

Jessica Knoll, Senior Editor for Cosmo: “Have Easier, Stronger Orgasms,” (Cosmo U.S., May 2012, page 179).

Except that Ms. Knoll did not cite her source. She decided to steal it.

I don’t mean lifting a well-written sentence or two. I mean plagiarism with a capital P.

(Click here to view a pdf of “Have Easier, Stronger Orgasms.”)

UPDATE: Ms. M responds.

Ms. M:

Try asking the next person you encounter to tell you where the clitoris is located.  Having posed this question to others many times myself, I’ll guess that the majority of answers you receive will sound something like, “It’s that small bulb at the top of my lips,” or, “That’s the button up under the hood.”

Cosmo:

If someone were to ask you to describe the location of your clitoris, what would you say? Maybe “It’s that buttonlike think above my vagina”?

Ms. M:

The scientific name for the external “little button” or “bulb” is glans.

Cosmo:

The tiny button that was mistakenly dubbed the clitoris is actually the glans of the clitoris

Ms. M:

This little structure contains approximately 8,000 sensory nerve fibers; more than anywhere else in the human body and nearly twice the amount found on the head of a penis!

Cosmo:

“The glans has about 6,000 to 8,000 nerve endings,” says Debby Herbenick, PhD, author of Sex Made Easy.” It’s roughly the same amount men have in the head of their penis”

Ms. M:

Even most of the women I coach, women who are generally worldly and well-informed about their own bodies, react with a combination of fascination and confusion when I explain that their clitoris extends deep within them.

Cosmo quoting Dr. Herbenick, not Ms. M:

“When I teach women about the internal clitoris, not only are they shocked that all this is going on inside them and they had no idea, but it’s also like a switch flips on in their minds”

Which raises the question, of course, as to why Ms. Knoll would attribute a botched version of Ms. M’s quote to Dr. Herbenick.  Could it have something to do with promoting Dr. Herbenick’s new book? Was Dr. Herbenick misquoted, or was she in on it too?

(UPDATE: Excellent post by Dr. Herbenick explaining how she was neither mis-quoted nor apparently in on anything. Read it here. “Ultimately, information about the clitoris belongs to us all – especially factual statements for which there are few new ways to say them.” My apology to Dr. Herbenick and thanks for her response.)

Ms. M: “They didn’t even mention the doctors who worked with no funding to do the research.”

Ms. M’s research was self-funded – the Museum of Sex does not pay writers for their contributions to the blog – and included calls to doctors in Paris at 4am (she speaks fluent French), conversations with oncologists, urologists, and her own gynecologist, who she says was surprised by the findings.

I had friends sneak me into the Columbia Medical School Library. I worked out an exchange with the New York City Medical Library to get my hands on The Journal of Sexual Medicine, August 2010, Volume 7, Issue 8 where [Dr. Buisson’s] and Dr. Foldès’s findings were published – normally a $900 annual subscription.

The irony should not be lost that Cosmo stole what they could have had for free – with proper attribution.
To be fair, a Mr. Robert Conway, Senior Photo Editor for Cosmo, did email the Museum of Sex in February, asking who owned the rights to the images in Ms. M’s post, and who he could contact for permission to use them.In her post, Ms. M credits Dr. Buisson and Dr. Foldès for the 3D imagery:

Alas it wasn’t until as recent as 2009, French researchers Dr. Odile Buisson and Dr. Pierre Foldès gave the medical world it’s first complete 3-D sonography of the stimulated clitoris.

The hand-drawn sketches in the post are her own.

 

erect internal clitoris by Buisson and Foldes

Ms. M’s sketch of the erect internal clitoris

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Museum passed Ms. M’s email address to Mr. Conway, but Mr. Conway never emailed her –  to request permission to use her hand-drawn sketches, or to contact Dr. Buisson and Dr. Foldès.

Why credit your source when you can just make up your own? Here’s what Cosmo went with:

 

Cosmo U.S., May 2012, p 179

 

But wait – it gets worse!

In August, longtime Cosmo editor Helen Gurley Brown died, setting off a firestorm of news features, like How Cosmo Conqured the World, an excellent read by Edith Zimmerman for The New York Times, in which she describes Cosmo’s lean, mean editorial machine:

The brand saves money by repurposing its covers across various editions, and it shaves costs in other ways, too. For the most part, articles are created by a small team of staff members at Big Cosmo and then ripple outward through the Cosmo network. Writers do not receive royalties when their work is repurposed. Huffy freelancers are virtually nonexistent….

One byline that regularly appears in editions around the world is that of Jessica Knoll, a pretty, friendly and immaculately put-together 28-year-old senior editor. Over drinks at a quiet wine bar near the Big Cosmo office, Knoll explained that it’s not only cheaper to produce features from within but also easier for maintaining the Cosmo voice.

And anyway, there’s less of it to write these days: “We did a redesign in January and slashed word count,” she said. “Part of that is because we live in a Twitter generation. We’re not going to be indulgent writers who ramble on for a couple thousand words — we need to find a way a to say things quickly but also have some personality.”

(Ms. M’s post: 1,432 words.)

Then, Ms. Knoll takes credit for the plagiarized story:

“I learned a lot from your recent, um, article,” I said to her, about eight minutes into our meeting. “About the wishbone-shaped… uh…”

“Oh, about the internal clitoris?” she said. “See, I don’t get bashful. It becomes completely normal to talk to your boss and have the word ‘penis’ appear 15 times in your conversation.”

The article in question — “Have Easier, Stronger Orgasms” — was on “surprising new findings” about the clitoris based on research done in the 1990s (not exactly new) but features an interview with a woman whose sex book came out this year (new).

(Ms. M clarifies: “Dr. O’Connell published work on cadavers in 1998, 2004 and 2005.  It wasn’t until 2009 that Buisson and Foldès did the first sonogram of an erect internal clitoris. Before then, we had no idea about how the internal clitoris functions regarding erection.”)

Then, Ms. Knoll digs her grave a little deeper:

It ran in the May edition of Cosmo U.S. and will likely appear in Cosmos around the world for months to come. “It’s always our goal to make something feel timely and fresh,” Knoll said. “Nothing can be evergreen.
Even if it’s an age-old idea, we have to somehow find a way to put a fresh spin on it.”

Here’s an age-old idea: Credit your source.

We can even put a fresh spin on it and call it hyperlinking.

Here’s how it works:

  1. Simply highlight the website within the interNet browser like InterNet Explorer.
  2. Copy it by right clicking on your mouse and choosing COPY.
  3. Paste it in the place you wish use it in like MS Word or an email by right clicking agin and choosisng PASTE..

Then hit “Enter.” (Thanks to Ganderton on wiki.answers.com for the instructions. See? Hyperlinking. Not that hard.)

People often talk about the internet as if it’s this lawless place where someone can steal what is rightfully yours – an article, a copyrighted song, a sex tape – and spread it infinitely over the internet.

But the internet also gives us hyperlinking!  Steven Johnson, in his 1999 book Interface Culture: “The hyperlink is the first significant new form of punctuation to emerge in centuries.”

A new form of punctuation 37 different websites that picked up Ms. M’s post all managed to include.

A new form of punctuation the old print world can’t actually print – or perhaps be bothered with. (See also: Jonah Lehrer, Fareed Zakaria.)

The internet also gives us a fighting chance of finding out who stole your work and calling them out. How did you call someone out in an analog world? A letter to the editor?

So I’m calling out Jessica Knoll, Robert Conway, @Cosmopolitan and Cosmo U.S. Editor-in-Chief @katemwhite.

What’s the deal? How are you going to address this before you syndicate plagiarized content – albeit on a topic as many women as possible should hear about – to your global empire of 100 million readers?

Or did you already?

How would we even tell? There are no hyperlinks in print!

All this attention on Cosmo is a nice reminder that the magazine once had a place on the cutting edge of sex – 50 years ago. In print.

I appreciate its place in our history, but “50 Kinky Sex Moves” is no longer cutting edge. It’s Kama Sutra.

(Ms. M: “I’ve probably had more sex than all of the women in that Big Cosmo office combined.”)

The cutting edge of sex is online, where people are writing from passion, not paychecks.

People like Ms. M, Cindy Gallop, Dan Savage, Laura Augustin, Stephen Ira, Melissa Gira Grant, Tracy Clark-Flory. (Perhaps Ms. Knoll, if she’d like to contribute something original?)

If Cosmo were smart, they’d try hiring a few of them.

UPDATE: Read Ms. M’s perspective on how the Cosmo Clitoris Heist went down.

Julie Ruvolo is a freelance writer. She co-edits digital publications for the New York Museum of Sex and edits RioChromatic.com.

Who else is writing on the cutting edge of sex? Share your recommended reading in the comments.

A BDSM Secret Revealed, Does Size Really Matter And Did He Give Me Genital Warts?

Have a question for Ms. M.?  Email: AdviceFromMsM@gmail.com

Dear Ms. M.,

I am a 34 year old female in relationship with a 31 year old male.  We have been together for the past seven months.  I just found he is into BDSM lifestyle.  I have never done that and not really into it but recently we concluded he can’t maintain an erection or get his rocks off any other way.  What do I do?

Seven months in, and you’re only now hearing of this?  Perhaps this shines a bigger light on the fact there is an obvious lack of communication in your relationship.

Your question, however, does draw attention to a bigger issue within dating culture.  Many people don’t acknowledge sexual compatibility is important, sometimes even vital for a happy healthy relationship, and therefore, it’s not openly discussed as soon as it should be.  Since discussing the last porn video we exploded to on a first date isn’t exactly kosher, I can understand this to some extent.  But seven months is a long time to go without discussing your sexualities, fantasies, and desires.  Can you imagine being with someone for seven months, and never having discussed your favorite foods or favorite music?

You have three options.

  • Try out the BDSM lifestyle.  Who knows – you might be surprised, and it might even grow on you (pun intended).  But be sure to set up some rules of engagement first so you feel comfortable and safe.  Having a safety word that lets your partner know when you’ve reached or surpassed your threshold is always a great idea.
  • Stay with him … until the insecurities of not fulfilling his sexual desires drive you mad.  You’ll wonder if he’s cheating and likely feel inadequate in addition to not getting your own sexual needs met.  The feeling that you can’t satisfy your partner sets you up for disappointment and a rocky relationship.
  • Leave him.  Next time you start dating someone, have the talk about your sexualities, likes and dislikes, sense of adventure, and openness much sooner than seven months in – it will save you from another difficult situation like this one and hopefully lead you to someone with whom you’re sexually compatible.

Best of Luck,

Ms. M.

_______________________________________________________________________________________

Hello Ms. M.,

If most women need clitoral stimulation to get off anyway, does size really matter?

That’s equivalent to asking, “If most women like ice cream, does the flavor really matter?”  It’s a complicated question, based on individual preferences, not a generalization based on gender. 

To answer your question: yes and no.  If you’re an expert at giving a particular partner earth shattering orgasms orally and that happens to be the best way she reaches climax, then perhaps size won’t matter as much to her.  But keep in mind, just because your refined oral skills work on one girl, doesn’t mean they’ll have the same effect on another. 

If she’s a gal who needs a specific angle, pressure, and time to work up to an orgasm with your cock inside of her, it’s possible size can make a difference.  You see, the majority of the clitoris is actually internal, not external.  Size can matter, depending on her unique and individual anatomy.  When your penis is inside her vagina, it is stimulating her internal clitoris, which becomes engorged encompassing the vagina – sort of hugging it.  What most people refer to as vaginal orgasms are simply internal clitoral orgasms – society’s beliefs and ways of articulating things just haven’t caught up with science yet (which by the way, didn’t give us this information until the first sonogram of an internal erect clitoris was performed in 2009).  To learn more, check out my article on the Internal Clitoris.

(((Big Hug))),

Ms. M.

_______________________________________________________________________________________

Ms. M.,

I am gay and furious.  My boyfriend just told me he has genital warts.   A) Does this mean he’s cheating?  B) Did that asshole give me something?

Dear Gay and Furious,

Genital warts are caused from the human papillomavirus (HPV), the most common STI there is.  In fact, in the US alone the lifetime risk of acquiring HPV is 75% for sexually active adults; world wide it is 80-85%.  There are 40 different types, or strains, of HPV that can infect the genital areas.  Some strains cause warts, other strains lead to various cancers if not caught in time, the most common of which is cervical cancer.  Less common cancers that can be caused by HPV include cancer of the vulva, vagina, penis, anus, and oropharynx (back of throat including base of tongue and tonsils).  The types of HPV that can cause genital warts are not the same types of HPV that cause cancer.

Many people never show symptoms and therefore never know they have it.  Warts typically appear within three weeks to six months after sexual contact with an infected person, but they can also take years to appear.  So to answer your question – no, his warts are not valid proof he’s cheating on you.  In fact, if he’s being honest and communicating with you about all of this, as embarrassing as it is for him, I’d see it as a good sign that he obviously cares about you and your safety.

Yes, it’s possible you have contracted HPV from him, but it’s so common if you’ve had sex or even skin-to-skin genital contact with more than two people in your lifetime, odds are you’ve come into contact with the virus before.  The good news is that in 70% of cases the body’s immune system clears the HPV infection naturally within one year; give it two years that statistic shoots up to 90%.

Definitely get checked out ASAP.  Your doctor may perform a visual examination of your penis, an anal pap smear, and throat examination.  In addition, you should also inquire about getting vaccinated with Gardasil.  It protects against the four strains of HPV linked to 70% of cancers caused by the virus, and most types of HPV that cause of genital warts.

Love Always,

Ms. M.

_______________________________________________________________________________________

Have a question?  Email me here: AdviceFromMsM@gmail.com

Or follow me on Facebook and Twitter.

 

The Internal Clitoris

Consider this: In over five million years of human evolution, only one organ has come to exist for the sole purpose of providing pleasure—the clitoris. It is not required for reproduction. It doesn’t have a urethra running through it like the penis, and thus, does not urinate. Its sole function—its singular, wonderful purpose—is to make a woman feel good!

Sadly, it is precisely because the clitoris has no function apart from female pleasure that science has neglected to study it as intricately as the penis. In my last post I wrote about Princess Marie Boneparte and her revolutionary work on the female orgasm. There was however, one piece of pertinent information she was lacking that science had not yet discovered: the true size and scope of the clitoris.

Try asking the next person you encounter to tell you where the clitoris is located. Having posed this question to others many times myself, I’ll guess that the majority of answers you receive will sound something like, “It’s that small bulb at the top of my lips,” or, “That’s the button up under the hood.” Although these responses aren’t exactly wrong, the interesting truth is that the majority of the clitoris is actually within the pelvis—that is, it’s far more internal than external. Even most of the women I coach, women who are generally worldly and well-informed about their own bodies, react with a combination of fascination and confusion when I explain that their clitoris extends deep within them.

The scientific name for the external “little button” or “bulb” is glans. Not to be confused with glands, glans simply refers to a small circular mass. This little structure contains approximately 8,000 sensory nerve fibers; more than anywhere else in the human body and nearly twice the amount found on the head of a penis! From reading her work, it’s clear that Marie Bonepart mistakenly thought that the clitoris was completely comprised of the glans; and because it is super sensitive and all anyone can see of the organ, her confusion is mirrored by most women today. The fact is though, that most of the clitoris is subterranean, consisting of two corpora cavernosa (corpus cavernosum when referring to the structure as a whole), two crura (crus when referring to the structure as a whole), and the clitoral vestibules or bulbs.

The glans is connected to the body or shaft of the internal clitoris, which is made up of two corpora cavernosa. When erect, the corpora cavernosa encompass the vagina on either side, as if they were wrapping around it giving it a big hug!

Sketch of an erect clitoris

The corpus cavernosum also extends further, bifurcating again to form the two crura. These two legs extend up to 9cm, pointing toward the thighs when at rest, and stretching back toward the spine when erect. To picture them at rest, imagine the crura as a wishbone, coming together at the body of the clitoris where they attach to the pubic symphysis.

Near each of the crura on either side of the vaginal opening are the clitoral vestibules. These are internally under the labia majora. When they become engorged with blood they actually cuff the vaginal opening causing the vulva to expand outward. Get these puppies excited, and you’ve got a hungrier, tighter-feeling vaginal opening in which to explore!

What does all this mean? Well, for starters, we can finally end that age-old debate of vaginal vs. clitoral orgasms.

In 1953, Kinsey wrote: “The vagina walls are quite insensitive in the great majority of females … There is no evidence that the vagina is ever the sole source of arousal, or even the primary source of erotic arousal in any female.”

Then in 1970, Germaine Greer published The Female Eunuch, which scoffed at Kinsey’s theory. She wrote, “It is nonsense to say that a woman feels nothing when a man is moving his penis inside her vagina. The orgasm is qualitatively different when the vagina can undulate around the penis instead of a vacancy.”

Interestingly, they’re both right. The vagina is not the sole source of arousal, though to stimulate the inner clitoris you can greatly do so by manipulating, displacing, and exploring the vagina with a penis or other apparatus.

Sketch of an erect clitoris

Many women can bring themselves to orgasm without ever inserting anything inside of themselves. They are causing their internal clitoris to become erect and likely stimulating their glans, bulbs, and crura by rubbing themselves on the outside. The corpus cavernousum is the additional erectile tissue encompassing the vagina, and greatly erogenous when stimulated internally.

Let’s also remember, female orgasm is not solely about the clitoris and vagina either. It is far more complex and also involves the workings of multiple nerves, tissues, muscles, reflexes, and mental effort. Some women can think themselves to orgasm. Others can orgasm simply by flexing their pelvic muscles. Considering all the components involved plus the variability of human beings and their anatomies, it’s extremely important to remember no two people are the same. What works for one woman may not work for another. In other words, it’s all custom under the hood.

What really blows my mind is the plethora of misinformation that exists in textbooks, professional medical guides, and on the internet. Take for example, in one of my undergraduate textbooks titled Understanding Human Sexuality, the clitoris is depicted merely as just the glans. The sad fact is it wasn’t until the 1990’s that researchers began using MRI to study the internal structure of the clitoris. By then, the intricate details of the penis were already well known.

Urologist Helen O’Connell of the Royal Melbourne Hospital set out to better understand the microscopic nerve supply to the clitoris using MRI, something that had already been done for men with regard to their sexual function in the 1970s. In 1998 she published her findings, informing the medical world of the true scope and size of the clitoris. Yet ironically that same year, men in America began popping Viagra to cure erectile dysfunction.

Sketch of a clitoris at rest

In 2005 The American Urological Association published one of Dr. O’Connell’s reports on clitoral anatomy. The report itself even states, “The anatomy of the clitoris has not been stable with time as would be expected. To a major extent its study has been dominated by social factors … Some recent anatomy textbooks omit a description of the clitoris. By comparison, pages are devoted to penile anatomy.” The report also mentions how seemingly impossible it is to understand the internal structure of the clitoris with just one diagram. Several are required to truly get a comprehensive understanding of it.

Alas it wasn’t until as recent as 2009, French researchers Dr. Odile Buisson and Dr. Pierre Foldès gave the medical world it’s first complete 3-D sonography of the stimulated clitoris. They did this work for three years without any proper funding. Thanks to them, we now understand how the erectile tissue of the clitoris engorges and surrounds the vagina—a complete breakthrough that explains how what we once considered to be a vaginal orgasm is actually an internal clitoral orgasm.

The internal erect clitoris

Dr. Foldès has been performing surgery on women who have suffered from clitoral mutilation, restoring pleasure to over 3,000 circumcised patients. He also gets passionate about the lack of study with regards to the clitoris:

“When I returned to France to treat genital mutilation, I was amazed that they were never tried. The medical literature tells us the truth about our contempt for women. For three centuries, there are thousands of references to penile surgery, nothing on the clitoris, except for some cancers or dermatology—and nothing to restore its sensitivity. The very existence of an organ of pleasure is denied, medically. Today, if you look at the anatomy books that all surgeons have, you will find two pages above. There is a real intellectual excision.

The internal erect clitoris

So there you have it. As if all the repression, cultural influences, guilt, childhood imprints, and fear of being our true selves center stage in society weren’t enough, we also have the politics of medicine keeping us in the dark. The great news is that researchers like Dr. Buisson, Dr. Foldès, and Dr. O’Connell are paving the way for greater knowledge … and greater pleasure!

Hope springs … internal!

Now for something a little less serious and more fun! Here is a video of artist and sex educator, Betty Dodson, drawing the internal clitoris.  Note: the glans are accidentally labeled “glands” in the video, but remember the proper term is glans!! Enjoy!

-Ms. M

 

Have a question or comment? Email me here: AdviceFromMsM@gmail.com

Be sure to follow me, Ms. M. on Facebook and Twitter.